Author: Yanette Redmouth

Power Meals

FRENCH CREPES

2 cups flour

2 large eggs

2 Tbs sugar

2 cups milk

2 Tbs Cooking oil

Combine the flour, sugar, eggs and milk and beat until smooth. The resulting batter should be the consistency of thick cream. Add oil to the batter and mix lightly. Spray an 8-inch crepe pan with non-stick cooking spray.

Ladle about ½ cup of the batter into the pan and rotate the pan to spread the mixture evenly. Cook the crepe until it looks firm and is lightly browned at the edges (about one minute). Turn the crepe over with a thin spatula and cook the other side about 30 seconds. Re-coat pan with non-stick cooking spray about every other crepe, or when crepes begin to stick.

Add your favourite sugar-free fruit filling to top off these thin, delicious breakfast favourites.

(* Standard Cup Measurement: 1 cup = 250ml)

FRUIT FLAVOURED OATMEAL

1 cup one-minute oatmeal

½ cup raisins

¼ cup walnuts, chopped

1 banana, sliced

¼ cup skimmed milk

1 tsp artificial sweetener

Cook the oatmeal and place in a bowl. Add fruit and walnuts; mix in milk and sweetener and enjoy! Add cinnamon if desired.

BLUEBERRY PROTEIN PANCAKES

1 cup oatmeal

8 egg whites

¾ cup blueberries (frozen or tinned if not in season)

6 tsp sweetener

Mix all ingredients in a blender until consistency is smooth. Cook in pan coated with non-fat cooking spray; turn once to cook both sides. Makes one serving. Each serving consists of: protein 50g, carbohydrates 60g, and calories 440.

This recipe really packs the protein and carbs to give you energy for your morning workout.

Stay Healthy In Retirement

Establish a Healthy Eating Plan

There are many benefits you can derive from having a healthy eating plan, which you can alter as your body and life change over time. A healthy diet is the foundation of everything, and with it you can stay mentally sharp, strengthen the immune system, drive up your energy level, and ward off illness and disease. If you have a pre-existing medical condition, a balanced diet makes it easier for you to manage chronic health issues and speeds up recuperation.

To have a well-balanced diet, don’t forget to include breads or any other cereals, milk and milk products, meat or protein alternatives, as well as fresh fruits and vegetables in your daily eating plan. Make sure to minimize sugar, sodium and fat consumption. To keep your body well-hydrated, drink at least eight glasses of water each day.

Maintain an Active Lifestyle

Living an active lifestyle in retirement is one of the critical things to keep you in good physical shape and mental health. Your health will immensely improve even if you can only spare 15 to 30 minutes each day to devote for walking or any forms of physical activity. Exercise helps to build strong muscles and bones. When combined with a balanced and healthy diet, exercise reduces fat tissues in your body. With strong muscles, you become mobile, improve your balance and protect your joints and spine. The risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and strokes is significantly diminished with physical activity.

Keep Stress under Control

Stress can adversely affect your health and quality of life, if not managed properly. Stress can bear heavy on your emotional state, but it is the damage it inflicts on your heart and digestive system that can be most harmful. To help release stress from your body and mind, you may want to engage yourself in some stress-busting activity such as yoga and meditation.

Make sure to identify the things that put too much stress into your life. After you have done so, minimize interaction with people or avoid situations causing the stress. Live within your means. This may not be usually cited in stress management programs, but it will surely eradicate many stresses in your life.

Children to Be Active

First of all, it helps if you’re pretty active, yourself. You can’t just talk the talk, here. You have to walk the walk. Kids do what they see YOU do.

When your children see that you actively participate in and enjoy outdoors activities, they’ll want to do the same. It’s a blueprint that you’re setting for them that they will touch back on later in life. Be it biking, going swimming, or just playing catch with them, seeing you active and enjoying sports and physical activities will rub off on them in a very big way.

Remember that children tend to pick up your good habits, as well as your bad ones. It has been proven that children with parents who smoke are more likely to become smokers later on. It’s the same for everything else they see you do. Or not do. They are learning from you what to do, and how to be. So, by the same token, your good habits will set an example for them, as well. If they see you just sitting around on the couch all day just lounging around when you’re not at work, and never being active, then that’s setting the tone for the type of adults they’re more likely to become. Sedentary and inactive. Try to avoid that by getting outside and doing physical activities, both with and without your kids.

Good influences start early. Be sure that you’re setting a good, healthy, active example for your child. It can only lead to a better, healthier, happier future for them

Tips for New Runners

Invest in a proper pair of running shoes

This may seem obvious, but I cannot overstate how much trouble you can save yourself by taking 30 minutes to work with an associate at your local running store. They will review your running stride and many times record it so you can see the mechanics of your feet as you run. Who knew that some people’s feet naturally roll outward when the foot lands (Supination) and other’s roll inward (pronation). I certainly did not. After a few minutes with an experienced runner, they were able to recommend the appropriate type of shoe for my natural running stride. They were also able to help me decide on how much support I needed versus how much cushioning the shoe provided.

After being fitted with a proper shoe, the aches in my knees and lower legs (shins and calves) were greatly reduced.

Of all the tips for new runners, this is, without a doubt, the most valuable. If you are making a true lifestyle change then this is a non-negotiable tip.

Less is More

This may sound counter-intuitive, but I assure you that trying to do too much too fast will HURT! Running as with any other exercise requires periods of exertion and recovery in order for the body to adapt and become stronger. Well unlike other activities running requires longer periods of recovery. While sorting through the multitude of plans and advice available on the web as well as through trial and error, the 80/20 rule is the best place to start. 80 percent of all your running should be at a low or very low intensity. Best advice is if you plan on incorporating running into your life, build up your base and DO NOT OVERTRAIN.

Walking is perfectly fine

If you are just getting into or recently started running, then you already know that it takes a while to build up the endurance to run for more than a short distance. (When I started, I could not run a 1/4 of a mile). While you are building up that endurance there is absolutely nothing wrong with incorporating walking breaks into your training. In fact, it is one of the best ways to help build your endurance as a new runner. Provided the walking is at a brisk pace, your heart rate and breathing will be accelerated and therefore, your body will be actively improving its aerobic conditioning. I am not sure where I first heard it, but it rings very true;

“You go just as far running a 5-minute mile as you do running a 15-minute mile.”- Unknown

Develop a Mantra

At the beginning, I struggled with staying motivated. Truthfully, I still struggle with staying motivated. Let’s face it, it is hard to be motivated when you can only run for 30 seconds and then walk for 2 minutes. It can be hard to truly appreciate the small gains you make day over day. Don’t let this struggle get the better of you. Most people who stop running do so in the first week of trying. Appreciate the small gains and celebrate the improvements. Even if you find that tomorrow you can jog for 31 seconds… celebrate the accomplishment. You earned it. If you begin to have negative thoughts and trust me EVERYONE has them from time to time, develop a mantra to push the thoughts from your mind while running. “I’ve got this”, “All Walls have doors”, or my personal favorite and fallback “Today, Define yourself” are each examples of good strong mantras. My own experience suggests that you should avoid negative words in your Mantra. Avoid Don’t, Can’t, Won’t, etc., the subconscious is a powerful thing no need to feed it negative energy. Whenever you have a negative thought as you run, immediately start to repeat your mantra. Soon, you will be able to push the negative thoughts out as quickly as they appear and allow positive thoughts to replace them. This may be the most overlooked of the tips for new runners.

Reasons Why Your Medical Career Crashes

Once you become a doctor, it marks a turning point at which most doctors start slipping backward. There’s a reason! 
Your burning passion and rugged determination for your medical career goals are not enough to overcome the barriers to your planned and expected maximum success in medical practice. It’s a reality that you shouldn’t have to face, and that you don’t deserve.

There are reasons why and what you can do about it. It’s one of the most distressing, yet understandable, factors leading to career failure. The meaning of failure as used here is the complete inability of over 95% of doctors to reach their maximum potential as a doctor.

It also includes your inability to create and maintain a medical practice that will ever reach the profitability potential it has the capacity to foster. In clearer terms, unless you are prepared to do what needs to be done to reach those highest levels of accomplishments, you will fail to a significant degree.

The inability refers to the absence of training and education that are required to rise above the others. As a result, you are effectively programmed to fail by the institution that qualified you to be a doctor.

Consider a few factors that lead you to this unholy position

You have not been provided with the essential tools to run your medical practice business efficiently and profitably. It means you have no business or marketing training or education.

A challenge to your intellect and common sense

Is it possible in our present economic environment to create a successful, constantly growing, medical practice business when the doctor owner has no real knowledge about how to do that effectively without expert help?

A “no” answer indicates you are quite comfortable about extracting from your medical career just enough abundance and satisfaction to make do. In other words, you are a hostage to your circumstances.

A “yes” answer indicates that you have not yet matured in business far enough to recognize that all of your sheer-brilliance in medical knowledge is never enough to create a maximally productive medical practice business-just enough to get by with for a while.

You have “educational burnout” without even recognizing it. The evidence of this is obvious when you consider these issues:

  • Why is it necessary to require doctors to complete CME hours for maintaining medical licensure?
  • Why is it compulsory to recertify for specialty credentialing?
  • Why is it that once you start medical practice there is no urgency or self-implied obligation to voluntarily maintain and continually update your medical knowledge?
  • Why is it that the need to have a business education is such an unnecessary and objectionable necessity that is totally ignored by most doctors? Yes, you promised yourself there would be no more burning the midnight oil again.

What possible reason would medical education pundits have to neglect the need to provide business as well as medical education to medical students? Could it be that they knew about the educational burnout phenomenon and didn’t want that to happen during your medical education and training? But was it OK if it came afterward?

Your passion for practicing medicine gradually becomes crowded out of your mind. That’s because once you become aware of the fact that your medical career is not able to provide you with the higher goals you had in mind at the start and turned out to be only a pipedream in reality.

For those doctors who already have wealth and adequate funding, there seems to be no real concern about these kinds of issues. However, for most doctors that is not the case. My concern is about the latter.

The real-life examples of how these arcane factors are born

The sequence of ominous changes in your passion for your medical career is one of the most distressing, yet understandable, factors leading to career failure. It begins with graduation from medical school, sometimes even sooner. It’s something older doctors see in their rear view mirror.

Prestige, recognition, fulfillment, happiness, and expectations in your medical career seldom increase with time but rather fade with time. As you proceed in your medical career goal setting beyond medical school, the bright lights, celebrations and spectacular accomplishments disappear in the sunset. It starts almost immediately on entering your medical practice.

The day you completed your internship, were you given a loud sendoff, glory, and recognition that would shake the pillars of medicine? Did you deserve that? Absolutely… but it doesn’t happen.

The revelation suddenly hits you in the fact that there will be no more public pats-on-the-back. From now on your dedication to your obligations and career success becomes an investment in personal satisfaction.

Your reward for completing a residency in your specialty is simply whittled down to a medical certificate of residency completion, not a rousing cheering crowd. Your self-esteem benefits, but your wallet suffers.

Either you are headed for the private medical practice of some nature, or you are feeling the overpowering need for security by becoming an employed physician.
Right here at the end of all your formal medical training, you are at the highest level of your medical knowledge with the incredible skills and ambition to take-on any of medical practice challenges put in front of you. From here on you are on your own.

No one is there to push or inspire you further and higher, except yourself. Previously, you had back up. Now you don’t. Even your family that has not lived in your shoes themselves can’t really help you much in your medical career choices and goals.

The next step in your career is even more stressful. And it’s outrageously insulting to all new doctors. Why? Because you don’t deserve this second step of disappointment as your reward for years of sacrifice and struggle.

Medical practice becomes your next teacher and mentor

This new environment of medical practice has a bundle of harsh lessons to teach you. Of course, no one has discussed these things with you in any depth because they didn’t want to discourage you. These soft lies of omission leave scars. It leaves you naïve and vulnerable, which is much worse than giving you the truth, to begin with.

This one thing is far more damaging to your medical career than you can believe. Every medical doctor is affected to a significant degree during his or her career as a result of being forced to adapt to the persistence of unexpected events that they could have prepared for if someone had told them what’s ahead.

Can you imagine how much stress in your practice over the years could have been prevented by knowing and preparing?

What are your options for avoiding or resolving these destructive factors regarding your medical practice career?

As with the activities and strategies required for success, there is no one simple laser-guided response for every person to follow to arrive at their personal highest level of achievement that they call “success.”

However, there is only one commonality found among the successful people that you may not care to hear about.

“It is a stronger, deeper, more unrelenting commitment to success far beyond what most ever marshal.”
(Source: No B.S. Marketing Letter, GKIC, Dan S. Kennedy, Nov. 2012)

This simple golden rule of success implies that we must reach a point in time when our minds become aware of the chain of events, predictable side effects, and consequences that are adherent to your decisions. Thus, it enables you to correctly ascertain whether a decision you make is complementary to your objective, diverges from your objective or is in direct conflict with your objective.

Your decisions about your medical career are even more complex than any you have previously made. It involves making good decisions at the start but doesn’t exclude good decisions being made throughout your medical practice years.

For most doctors and other medical professionals who haven’t lost their desire to perform at maximum levels, it will often require one or more of the following:

  1. You must know yourself
    What are your skills, talents, interests, activities that create satisfaction, biases, and toleration limits, among others? You need to spend a few hours quietly putting these attributes in order, even in priority. Sometimes it takes several sessions with other people (usually parents) who know you quite well and listening to what they see in you that you don’t see.
    Many college graduates are unaware of who they really are inside, and what capacity they have to succeed. Therefore, they stumble along relying on their “above average” intelligence to keep them on track to a few objectives.
    If you aren’t aware of what you need to do to be happy with your life and profession by the time you finish college, you are likely not to discover that later on. This factor becomes a life long millstone around your neck.
  2. You must continue to set goals to be accomplished during your whole life
    Without goals, you lose your passion and determination. Over 95% of doctors are hamstrung because they either have no idea what they are really capable of accomplishing or have fears that prevent them from moving to higher levels of accomplishment such as:
  • Fear of being taken advantage of of-easily led astray-analytical minded.
  • Fear of not being a success-of failing.
  • Fear of not fitting in-ostracized by peers-not a leader-hides the herd.
  • Fear of lack of approval of peers and friends-always social, energetic and fun-loving are the cover-up features.
    You don’t set goals because of these same fears. It’s why so many great people tell you to face your fears and go right on through them no matter what.
  1. Don’t expect a blueprint for success
    Lee Milteer, a professional highly regarded business mentor, says, “Success Is an Inside Job”. She teaches that you create your own success using the path from “visualization” to “mindset”. If you don’t understand that process, you need to find out how it works and trust it.
  2. Create a laser focus on one primary objective
    When you dilute your path with multiple goals, you are multitasking and are constantly changing decisions. You have set yourself up for a watered-down life and career.
    If you find you have chosen the wrong objective, then move to a new focus on another primary objective. Never focus on more than one.
  3. Real success in your medical career often results from maintaining your family obligations
    Your level of success is corrupted when you neglect your family relationships. Divorce, broken homes, financial disasters, and lack of a religious heart result in not being able to fully enjoy your success when and if it arrives.
  4. Make your personal integrity the basis of your career
    Your integrity creates your character that others see and respect. You maintain the principles you live by under all circumstances in your profession. When your “word” is unreliable, you corrupt everything around you one way or another. You then live off the garbage other people discard.

There are many more examples of solutions you probably have experienced and know the value of that may be just as important as the ones I’ve mentioned above. If you thought I was going to give you a 1-2-3-4-5 answer to gaining total control of your medical career, you haven’t been reading between the lines of this article well enough.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7809780

Boost Immune System With Vitamin C

The vitamin C deficiency that resulted from this practice caused sailors to come down with a sometimes-deadly disease called scurvy. Scurvy results in bleeding, poor healing of wounds, hair and tooth loss and joint pain. Indeed the list of potential ailments due to a deficiency of vitamin C are numerous, including anemia, bleeding gums and nose, inability to fight infection and gingivitis, easy bruising, swollen and painful joints and weakened tooth enamel. In response, the British navy stocked their ships with lemons and limes and included the juice from these fruits in the meals of sailors on their ships. The ‘limeys’ were able to keep their vitamin C intake high enough for their sailors to stay healthy over long journeys.

Vitamin C is not manufactured by other elements inside the body, so we must rely on food sources to maintain an adequate supply. Thankfully, you can find a wide variety of foods that are rich in vitamin C. Vitamin C is water-soluble and it is not stored in the body. Excess amounts are flushed out through the urine, and we must maintain a steady supply to support normal growth and development.

Your body uses vitamin C to grow new tissue, particularly skin, tendons, ligaments and blood vessels. This helps you to heal better from injuries and repair damage to cartilage and bones. Vitamin C is an important antioxidant that helps to prevent damage from oxidizing agents or free radicals in the body. Its antioxidant properties extend beyond itself in that vitamin C helps to recover other antioxidants including vitamin E after they have been oxidized.

A healthy nutritious diet including a variety of vegetables and fruits with every meal should supply all of the vitamin C that you need. Long cooking cycles degrade the vitamin C in the food so fresh, raw fruits and vegetables are recommended. Green leafy vegetables like kale and spinach are excellent sources of vitamin C and other important nutrients. Other good choices of vegetables are broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, peppers, cabbage, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and squash such as butternut or acorn squash.

Fruits rich in vitamin C include citrus varieties such as oranges, grapefruit, limes, lemons and tangerines. Berries including blueberries, raspberries, strawberries and cranberries are also good sources. Other good fruit sources are kiwi fruit, mango, papaya, pineapple and watermelon. Packaged foods may be fortified with vitamin C. Read the labels of breakfast cereals and other packaged food carefully as many of these contain very high levels of sugar, which will create other problems that are best avoided. You might also see ascorbic acid or dehydroascorbic acid listed in the ingredients to help you identify vitamin C.

If fresh fruits are not available, supplementation may help you to sustain your vitamin C levels and keep your immune system strong. In addition, higher levels of vitamin C may be required if you are exposed to smoking or for women who are breastfeeding. It is believed that vitamin C helps to shorten the duration of a cold, but there is no evidence that it will prevent the cold itself.

Seize the Herb

Trees in forests exhibit qualities that can rapidly inhibit plant fungus and insects that destroy it. They contain molecules, enzymes and peptides that are activated when facing death, threat or extinction. They are life supporting structures in forests to maintain the environment, clean out pollutants, reinforce their own cell life and accelerate self-regulatory, balancing properties for their ripe existence. Moringa is such a powerful tree.

Moringa is an essential supplement with chlorophyll, five times more than Spirulina and Wheatgrass. Chlorophyll is called the blood of the plant, and gives life to the plant cell in sunlight, accelerating growth and life. Modern scientists extract chlorophyll and use it in injections or topical ointments in conjunction with focussed light therapy. This is known as photo dynamic therapy. It is a solution to reduce and evaporate tumors or malignant cancers, even internally. In 2014, Jung IL reported a tumor suppressor activity in mammalian cells treated with cold water-soluble extract of Moringa oleifera leaves. Subsequent research has shown that ingredients in Moringa aqueous leaf inhibit the growth of lethal fast spreading cancer cells in breast and colorectal cancers of Saudi Arabian women. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are noncoding small RNAs regulating gene expression are possibly active after human ingestion for restoration to normalcy. Pharmaceutical management of this herb for anti cancer therapy, chemotherapy support, or even cancer prevention is a likely possibility for future alternative medicine and natural nutrition.

The power through many of its properties and ingredients to restore DNA and gene expression, makes Moringa possible for treating Alzheimer’s, systemic conditions, diabetes, asthma, skin disorders, brain disorders, anemia, arthritis, fungal and bacterial infestations.

Very interesting observation of this herb is in its use in inflammation. Experts in alternative medicine insist that inflammation is the root cause of all evils. Studies involving histological analysis of the lungs have shown that the extract reduced the number of leukocytes, cured asthma and its related allergies. The anti-inflammatory properties of the aqueous Moringa leaf in medicine was confirmed using an in vivomodel of acute inflammation; reduction in leukocyte migration, myeloperoxidas activity and the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were noted. These and subsequent scientific findings clearly indicate that the herbs contribution in nutrition and health will be to support liver function, detoxification, lymphatic drainage, sugar control (eliminating weight due to low sugar tolerance), and consequently build immunity. Enzymes that support thyroid function contribute to weight loss and boosting of metabolism. Many birds are captured with one stone.

Rediscovering Protein

This wave of malnutrition is not merely disconcerting to medical professionals. It is alarming. The situation has become so desperate that obesity will soon become the nation’s leading cause of preventable death.[v]

America’s nutritional dilemma is not, however, limited to obesity concerns. Malnutrition in non-overweight individuals is nearing epidemic levels. Millions of “fit looking” individuals subsist on a diet that is far too rich in carbohydrates a problem that has been enhanced for generations by the US FDA’s encouragement of refined carbohydrates as part of a balanced diet. We now know, however, that many of these refined carbohydrates are metabolically similar to candies and sweets. Added to this problem is that saturated fats continue to dominate many meals, particular those served in fast food restaurants.

Essentially then, the problem in America can be summed up as this: eat right or prepare to suffer shape up, or die a preventable death.

The first step in balancing America’s eating practices is to reintroduce the importance of protein. This neglect is all the more stunning given that, of the three major macronutrients – carbohydrates, fats, and proteins – proteins are the only essential component that human beings cannot live without.

Reintroducing protein as part of a healthy diet is made more difficult because many consumers do not know where to find a healthy source of protein. Unfortunately, most nutritional supplement sources bring with them a range unwanted carbohydrates, facts, and calories. Powerbar™, the “granddaddy” of nutritional supplements launched in 1987, has been rejected as an option by some consumers and health professionals because of high carbohydrate levels (45 grams), and low protein levels (10 grams) in each serving. Furthermore, dieters in particular have criticized Powerbar’s™ high 230 calories per bar –-more than 1/10th of the recommended caloric intake.

Other attempts to meet consumer demand for a high protein, low carbohydrate, low fat, and low calorie nutritional supplement have been supplied by products such as the York Bar™, the Blast Bar™, and the Ironman Bar™, respectively. However, each product has been judged by some consumers and medical professionals as having have similar Powerbar™-like drawbacks: high calorie levels (210, 180, 230 grams respectively), high carbohydrate levels (30, 36, and 51 grams, respectively), and most notably of all, low protein content (7, 10, and 4 grams, respectively).

While these products have certainly helped more people “think” about eating healthier, they have not, respectively, met the rigorous consumer expectation for a low carbohydrate, low calorie, low fat, and high protein nutritional supplement.

However, there is a product in the market today called Profect® that is receiving significant credible attention from both the consumer and medical communities.

Profect, a product of Pennsylvania-based Protica, Inc. (www.protica.com), provides 25 grams of protein in each fat-free, carbohydrate-free 100-calorie serving. Profect also offers a range of essential nutrients in each serving, including 100% of vitamin C and 50% of B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, Biotin and Folic Acid. All of this is delivered to consumers in a 2.7-ounce container designed to be virtually indestructible. The container also serves to increase storage life and heat resistance.

The debate for America’s protein and diet IQ will not begin with what is placed on a dinner table, or what is offered at a fast food restaurant. This is where the debate will end. Where it begins will be in the minds of consumers and medical professionals everywhere. High quality, accurate, and scientifically validated information is required to carefully choose a protein-rich balanced approach. For a growing number of investigative consumers, that solution centers around products like Profect.

Healthy Dose of Medicine for the Soul

From my perspective, if you cannot laugh with someone you will not be able to cry with him or her and have it mean anything.

According to some medical advice, it takes more facial muscles and energy to frown than it does to smile. Of course, the only exercise some people have is frowning and who am I to take that away from them.

I am determined, no matter what, to exercise my right to smile and laugh and enjoy the world around me. I must confess that I get this attitude quite honestly.

My paternal grandfather was a Past Master in the area of practical jokes. No amount of time was too much to spend preparing for one of his famous practical jokes. His favorite holiday was April 1 and began preparing for this holiday right after Christmas.

The fact that his practical jokes at times got him into trouble did not seem to affect him at all.

Once while in the hospital for an extended period he had somebody smuggle in to him a can of snuff. For some reason he liked chewing snuff. It is the most disgusting habit I know of on earth.

He no sooner received his smuggled goods then he began chewing it. If you know anything about chewing snuff, you know it is accompanied by a lot of spitting. As usual, his timing was impeccable. Just as the head nurse passed his door and looked in, he leaned over and spit in to the garbage can he had next to his bed. The nurse, not knowing about the chewing snuff, thought he was spitting blood and immediately went into emergency mode. Immediately my grandfather was rushed into the operating room and the surgeon and medical team were assembled.

My grandfather was very sick at the time. Some did not think he would get out of the hospital.

Just as they got him situated in the operating room he pulled from under his sheet his can of chewing snuff and smiled at them. The only person in the room that thought this was in any way amusing was my grandfather. The doctors were so angry with him that they refused to see him for three days and confiscated his can of chewing snuff.

My aunt and uncle lived right next to my grandfather. My aunt was hyper clean when it came to her house. Dirt in any form was not welcome under her roof. She had a broom that was always within reach because she never knew when a piece of dirt would try to invade her domicile.

That year my grandfather found something new. I am not sure where he found it but he probably spent a lot of time looking for something like this. It was a rubber facsimile of a very nasty looking piece of vomit. To him it was a prized possession.

Most of his practical jokes were executed on April 1. Whenever we saw grandfather coming on this particular day we usually ran for cover.

He went over to visit my aunt and was sitting on the couch in the living room. They chatted for a little while and then my grandfather began to cough a little bit. He said to my aunt, “I haven’t been feeling good lately. I really don’t know what it is.” Then he started to cough a little more seriously, to which, my aunt got up and went to the kitchen to get him a glass of water thinking that might help him.

When she got back, she was shocked to see on her new coffee table a very horrible sight. My grandfather was bent over the coffee table hacking and coughing as though he was in the process of dying. On the coffee table was a very nasty looking piece of vomit.

My aunt went into hysterics. She whirled around and within a moment had grabbed her broom and started towards my grandfather. My grandfather was laughing but not for long.

Suddenly he realized that the flailing broom in my aunt’s hand was aimed at him. She chased him out of the house, down the driveway and for at least three blocks yelling obscenities at him that I dare not repeat in public society.

Winter Running

Do not worry about breaking records

First of all, you need not to worry about increasing mileage or pace during winter times because the cold and icy condition make it more prone for you to slip and injuring yourself. We would like to also advise you to do your warm up indoors. Try to avoid icy roads and go for the snow, which provide better traction and grib. Shorten your stride and run slower for the sake of keeping safe during very ice and wet days ahead.

Clothing

Not surprisingly, you must wear proper winter clothing if you want to run during the winter. Wear thick dry socks and use slightly larger running shoes to accommodate the space needed for these socks. It is essential to keep your feet warm during winter runs to prevent frostbite and vessel problems. Also wear a warm hat during your runs. A great amount of body heat vapors through the head during cold condition and this will affect the circulation in your body. Your hands must be covered in wool gloves and you must also wear thick running suits. For shorts, you can wear those made of polypropylene or Lycra and combine it with wool running trousers.

Avoid Wind-chill

You must be careful and avoid running into a wind-chill. This extreme cold can be bad and dangerous. Experienced runners like to run into the wind to start their run and then return to the starting line with the wind blowing at their backs. This will make your return run easier as your body has become warmer.